Making an impact

I really enjoyed this video that wandered across my social media vision the other day.

It captures the precise moment that the singer, Patrick Bruel, realises how much he has made an impact on people.

He’s clearly had plenty of success in his career by this point, to be playing on such a stage. But even so, he’s surprised and overwhelmed to see thousands of people singing his song. It’s an experience that I would imagine few people get to experience. So much of people’s work these days in anonymous and transactional, which is a shame.

Making a impact as teachers

Educators are fortunate in that they get to see the true impact of their work, something that Taylor Mali powerfully captured in his poem “What Teachers Make”. One of the greatest rewards in a teacher’s career comes when they see a student achieve something and know that they played a part – sometimes incidental, sometimes instrumental – in that person’s success. Often, teachers never actually see the results of their influence, as their contribution is realised many years later or in totally different contexts and environments. As an English teacher, for example, my help in learning to write clearly could one day contribute to a student’s workplace promotion, a publication, or a viral blog post. The link may not be immediate or explicit, but there is one.

Making an impact as a career development educator

For me, one of the great things about being a careers educator is the immediacy of this feedback on my work. I may help a student revise a terrible resume into a good one, and later hear from them that they had been invited to a job interview. Or I may help a student articulate their career goals, and later get a Linkedin invitation from them in the role they dreamed of. I’m proud to know that I made a positive difference in their lives and motivated to keep doing what I can to educate and empower my students.